Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Hiwassee River’

bike the boat

Yesterday I worked; today I played.

Even though it is the first official day of spring, it felt more like summer.  Eighty-plus degrees and sunny.  The heat makes me want to ride to the river, and I figured I may as well try to do a little paddling.  I have a nice set-up to tow my boat with my Xtracycle, and it’s a happy combination to be able to ride and paddle on a beautiful day.

My put-in is just up the road from our house, about 4 miles.  Getting there was a breeze, literally.  Gently rolling with an overall downhill grade, and I had a nice tailwind.  It was definitely the easy part.  Arrived and locked the bike along the guardrail by the bridge, and was reminded again of the mess that has been made of this river by Olin and their mercury dumping – which thankfully will be ending soon, with their commitment to converting the plant to mercury-free processing.

Meanwhile, I still cannot comprehend how people are still willing to fish – and keep their catch – despite the clearly posted warnings of high levels of carcinogens in the fish.  Completely baffles me.  I’ve discussed it with several fishermen before, but I have learned to just keep my mouth shut.  There is no changing their minds; they perceive the risk as negligible.  (And I secretly shudder and shake my head).

I paddled away most of the afternoon, exploring and trying to navigate the very shallow water.   In places, I was paddling in only inches.  The Hiwassee River levels are regulated and controlled by TVA, and at this time of year they don’t typically release water upstream for recreational use in this inlet.  Hence, the lake that is filled and sparkling blue in late spring through summer, is filled with stumps and shoals and islands over the winter and into early spring.   The locals call this inlet Stump Lake.  A fitting name.

Dozens of Great Blue Herons were my company; I love to just sit and watch them fishing in the shallows.  Turtles were out sunning on stumps and logs, but would quietly slip into the water as I raised my camera lens.  One of the fishermen said he had seen a Bald Eagle near the bridge.  Sadly I missed it.   It was peaceful, quiet, and a beautiful afternoon to be on the water … and “pedaling” my arms rather than my legs for a change.

Having had enough sun and with fatigue setting in on my shoulders, I headed for home in the late afternoon – this time against a headwind, with a more uphill grade, requiring a bit more muscle to tow the boat.  I will confess my wimpy-ness by saying it felt good to get home.   Dinner was salad and veggie pizza.  Not fish.  Definitely not fish.

drawn to water

morning paddle

I am still here …

The temperatures have just been unseasonably (and unreasonably) hot, and I have been like some seminocturnal creature – out on my bike in the early morning or into the evening, in search of water to slide into, and avoiding the blinding heat of mid-day.  Some of you may love to see the mercury rise into the upper 90’s (F) each day.  Not me.   I’ll take riding in a snowstorm any day.

if only bikes could swim...

I’ve been drawn to the water.  A little paddling, early morning swimming at the Y, riding to the river.  It’s all a necessary alternative to riding through the rippling, shimmering heat rising from the pavement.  Simply looking at water cools me off.

Ironically, Mark and I are about to set off on another bike touring adventure – nothing as exciting as Italy, but we are really looking forward to it, just the same.  Except for the heat forecasted heat, of course.  Along with possible flooding along the route (that may be a story for another post).  Our timing is obviously not the greatest.  If nothing else, it will be some fresh scenery for my camera lens, as well as a chance to really put some mileage on the Xtracycles.  So stay tuned.

Meanwhile, summer is here in full bloom – and full heat.    Remember to drink plenty of water.  (Or swim in it, or bike alongside  it 😉 )

eveningride

eveningride

late hour glare

signs of summer

the day after

 

by the river

So what do you do the day after #330daysofbiking?  C’mon … did you really think there was any other option?  😉

Two of the boys were home for a brief weekend visit, with the local Battle of the Bands being the driver.  The boys’ band The Night Shines took the win this year (YAY!) – and they have a free download of their song Forest Fire on their bandcamp site, for anyone interested).

Ross and I had a perfect day to take a great ride up to and along the river.  After all of the grey and rain of the past days, it felt so good to have the sun shining.

While I don’t intend to keep a running tally of how many days I ride over the next year or so, I may just keep a personal log of the days I don’t – which hopefully will be kept to a bare minimum.

The perfect cycling life lesson appeared in my friend Jim’s (@bikerly) blog today; it can’t be said any better than this:

 

bikes, the people I love, and a beautiful day - it doesn't get any better

 

CELEBRATION!!!

 

from "the Olin files"

 

Yesterday, something compelled me to ride along the river – the Hiwassee River, up the road from our house.  I can’t begin to count how many times I have crossed this bridge and have been reminded by the TDEC warning sign of the mercury contamination in this beautiful body of water.   Or how many times I have watched (with disbelief) the people fishing, despite the warnings.  Yesterday was no different.  It always bothers me … and I’m sure you might be tired of me posting about it by now.

Last week, I attended a public hearing at our local Chamber of Commerce regarding a $41 million bond proposal for Olin Corporation through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.  My friend Suzanne Wisdom from Oceana, along with several concerned residents (including myself) made comment for the record – if Olin was to receive this funding, it should be imperative that they commit to converting their plant to mercury-free technology.

 

at the public hearing ... Cleveland/Bradley Industrial Development Board representative (left) and Suzanne Wisdom from Oceana (right)

The Chamber’s Industrial Development Board kindly told us that environmental issues did not factor into the issuance (or non-issuance) of this type of bond.   Of course.  But, as always, all we could continue to do was to speak out for the record.

Earlier today I received a phone-call from Suzanne … and it left me speechless.   As of mid-day today, here is an excerpt from the official Press Release from Oceana:

Olin Corporation’s Two Dinosaur Mercury Plants Will End Mercury Use and Releases

in Tennessee and Georgia

Oceana Celebrates Olin’s Response to Community and Customer Demands

The Olin Corporation announced today it will convert its mercury-based chlor-alkali manufacturing plant in Charleston, TN to modern, mercury free technology and eliminate mercury from its plant operation in Augusta, GA.   Oceana has been pushing for these actions since 2005. Olin’s plant in Tennessee is the largest remaining mercury-based chlorine plant of the four plants in the U.S. that had refused to make the switch to safer, more efficient technology.

In response, Oceana offers the following statement from Senior Campaign Director Jacqueline Savitz:

“This toxic, unnecessary practice was putting communities’ health at risk, and contaminating fish that could end up on dinner plates far from the plants themselves.   Olin’s Tennessee plant was the largest and released the most pollutants of the remaining mercury-based chlorine plants.   This shift will mean less mercury in the Hiwassee River, as well as in Charleston and the state of Tennessee,” added Savitz.

Olin’s announcement shows that even a large facility can shift to mercury-free technology in the time frame described in pending Senate legislation, which would require plants to shift  to mercury-free production by 2015. Olin will easily meet that timeframe, committing to shift to cleaner production technology by 2012 in Charleston, TN.  For that decision, we applaud them.

Finally, we are grateful that the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) will help to make the Tennessee conversion possible.

Oceana Tennessee Field Organizer Suzanne Wisdom, who has worked long and hard to exert community pressure on Olin to switch, offers the following reaction:

“I am excited to hear that Olin’s plant will ‘Go Mercury Free,’ just as Oceana and thousands of Tennessee residents have urged them to do.  I’m especially happy for the wonderful community of people who live near the plant. They have been the heart of this campaign and I know they are celebrating today,” said Wisdom.

And from the AP/Bloomberg this afternoon: “Olin plant will eliminate mercury in $160M upgrade”.

What can I possibly say????  Cause for celebration?  Are you kidding?! ABSOLUTELY!

Most of all, I cannot begin to express my heartfelt gratitude to Suzanne Wisdom from Oceana – who has worked tirelessly for so many years on this issue … who has been an inspiration and provided much-needed encouragement and support to the concerned citizens throughout our community … and who I feel most privileged to consider my friend.  Suzanne, you are my heroine!  It’s definitely time to celebrate!!!  😀

Dear Suzanne ... thank you for opening my eyes, for putting up with my rants, and for your never-ending supply of optimism

 

 

 

winter river ride

on the bridge, Hiwassee River inlet

 

I ventured out a little further today … the sun was shining, and after the low of 14’F, by afternoon we were back up around 40’F.  I just couldn’t help myself.

#330daysofbiking Day 232 of 254.

near "Stump Lake"

the road ahead

days of summer, days of bikes

bugs and bikes on a summer evening ~ #330daysofbiking, Day 115, 7/31/10

The days follow a pattern – a pleasant pattern.  Cycling, paddling, taking pictures, conversations, laughter, rest.  Watching the sun go down.  And come up again.  The summer is passing so quickly, sometimes I feel like I can’t quite get it all in.

Riding into town on Thursday, a trip on the Greenway.  It’s always heartening, inspiring, to see others on bikes – and their willingness and enthusiasm to stop and strike up a conversation.  (And yes – their agreeing to let me take their photos :). When we’re not boxed up in cars, I believe we’re much more inclined to interact, to converse.  It makes us more approachable, more a part of the community.   Stopping to talk with two other cyclists (and one of the Greenway police officers) and talking about the merits of the Greenway for getting across town, observing the increase in ride-share around town, and just enjoying the simple pleasure of having a “commons” – a place to walk, to ride, to just stop and sit.

Greenway conversations - David and Kevin

#330daysofbiking, Day 113, 7/29/10 ~ greenway conversations (David and Kevin)

Terry - a little "taking care of business" on the Greenway (Day 113)

The heat continues, and the evening continues to be one of the nicest times to get out.  A time to stow the camera in the Xtracycle and just take a leisurely spin on roads close to home.  Enjoying the “golden hour”, the hum of the cicadas.

#330daysofbiking, Day 114, 7/30/10 ~ the little things (on the road)

evening ride (Day 114)

Lazy Saturday mornings spent exploring the river by kayak.  Flat grey skies, calm still water – like glass.  Different than cycling, yet oddly similar, moving through the landscape.   A lesson in patience this morning – spending close to an hour slowly approaching a Little Green Heron, who graciously let me get incredibly close.

Little Green Heron (& a lesson in patience)

unlike cycling, there are no hills...

Ending the weekend riding with “my boys”.  Another summer day, another ride.  The sun comes up and goes down.  It passes so quickly.  I feel like I can’t quite get it all in.

#330daysofbiking Day 116, 8/01/10

boy on a bike 🙂

#330daysofbiking Day 112: bikayaking

easiest way to haul the boat - thank you, Xtracycle

Solo trip to the river today.  Just me, the bike, the boat, the camera … and a few of the things I saw on the water.

For the record, the scupper hole trailer + Xtracycle is the perfect combination for me; infinitely easier than trying to lift a boat onto a roof rack, or into a vehicle.  And truthfully, I could never fit the boat into/onto my tiny car anyway … so this is the ultimate freedom.  I can head out to the river any time, easy to load, easy to haul, everything fits, I get to ride my bike and paddle.  I am a happy camper.  (Or paddler, as it were.)

ruins

feather on the water

dragonfly

butterfly